Quantcast
ART STUFF on a plane # 35: ‘Collisions in Space’ - FAD Magazine

FAD Magazine

FAD Magazine covers contemporary art- News, Exhibitions, Interviews and cool art stuff reported on from London

ART STUFF on a plane # 35: ‘Collisions in Space’

gvaIMG_0401_2ss

Alison Gill: Detector (Kissing Gate), 2013

The location and atmosphere of an exhibition is a big part of the reason to see it, the more so given that some idea of the work can often be gleaned from the internet. I’ve recently been involved in two differently dramatic sites: curating a Maria Marshall solo show in a storage room off the side of a food factory near King’s Cross, stacked with such a quantity of tins and machinery we were tempted to claim it as an installation; and writing an essay for a show at the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS), one of the four experiments at the Large Hadron Collider in Geneva, where a scientific community of 6,000 work at the furthest edge of sub-atomic knowledge. The sophisticated 27 kilometre 4 metre diameter tunnel in which protons are smashed together at close to the speed of light is itself a stunning sight, well captured by Michael Hoch’s cross-section photograph below. Alison Gill’s installation To See a World was in a hall directly above a tunnel access point. An unusual site can have its hazards, though, and on the day I was visiting it proved necessary to ‘open the plug’ to bring materials above ground. All I saw were the sculptures unceremoniously stacked to one side, one of them broken, and a gaping chasm down to the mouth. Happily, all is now repaired and reinstalled, allowing a boundary-challenging meshing of physics, poetry, psychoanalysis and sculpture to take forward CMS’s sub-agenda of countering the modern separation of science from art.

gen cern-cms-higgs-boson-lhc-large-hadron-collider-correct

Michael Hoch: The Hadron Collider at CRS

Most days art Critic Paul Carey-Kent spends hours on the train, traveling between his home in Southampton and his day job in Surrey. Could he, we asked, jot down whatever came into his head?

Categories

Tags

Related Posts

New York based artist Marco Pariani

Christmas Already?

What makes art so inexhaustible? Not only does it responds to a vast and ever-changing world, but the artist chooses […]

Plenty of Pissarro

Camille Pissarro in 1900 Do you fancy owning a Pissarro? Perhaps you’ve been to his most substantial UK show in […]

Oslo, City of Sculpture

Edward Munch, very much a painter, is easily Norway’s most famous artist, and a new 13-floor building – ‘Munch’ as it is styled – was recently opened in his honour. Walking around Oslo, though, it would be easy to think that sculpture is the national preference: statues dot the streets and I visited four sculpture parks. For example:

Trending Articles

Submit Your Work

Submit your work to be featured on FAD