Quantcast
ART STUFF ON A TRAIN 10: WEAVING AND THE WEB - FAD Magazine

FAD Magazine

FAD Magazine covers contemporary art – News, Exhibitions and Interviews reported on from London

ART STUFF ON A TRAIN 10: WEAVING AND THE WEB

Most days art Critic Paul Carey-Kent spends hours on the train, traveling between his home in Southampton and his day job in Surrey. Could he, we asked, jot down whatever came into his head?

richter

Musa 

Gerhard Richter is the most expensive living artist (£24m auction record recently), and when you hear that he’s turned one of his paintings into four tapestries you might suspect he’s just milking his brand. Yet, on the contrary, the four woven works now on show at the smaller Gagosian Gallery retain a surprisingly painterly impact even as they move some way from the original source, Abstract Painting 724-4 (1990): each repeats four times, with kaleidoscopic reflections, the image of one quadrant of the painting.

Moreover, they’re just part of a radical revisiting of that scraped abstract. Richter has also used its digital template to generate thousands of computer transformations which conclude with massive ‘Strip’ displays of more than 8,000 stripes – abstract representations, you might say, of an abstraction. You can discover all this of this at another Richter phenomenon, namely his website. www.gerhard-richter.com provides a superbly organised and fully illustrated overview of everything Richter considers part of his oeuvre: for example well over a thousand paintings; his vast Atlas archive of source material (maybe 8,000 newspaper clippings and photos), drawings, overpainted photographs, works on paper, watercolours, artist’s books, works of glass, and sculptures. What’s the point, you might wonder, of a printed Catalogue Raisonné? But there’s also one of those in progress …

Abstract Painting 724-4 richter
Abstract Painting 724-4 (1990)Abstract Painting 724-4 (1990)

Read More Art Stuff on a train: HERE

Categories

Tags

Related Posts

Paul's Gallery of the Week: Camden Art Centre

Paul’s Gallery of the Week: Camden Art Centre

Camden Art Centre, founded in a former library building in 1965, has been in the news recently for an unwelcome reason: its annual Government funding has been cut by more than a third, from £937,000 to £600,000.

Paul’s Gallery of the Week: White Conduit Projects

White Conduit Projects is unusual in both location – in the middle of Islington’s bustling street market – and its programme. The gallerist, Yuki Miyake, is Japanese and her imaginatively varied exhibitions always have a link to her home country.

Navigating Venice

Autumn is a good time to visit the Venice Biennale, it being cooler and less crowded than earlier in the year.  Moreover, the 2022 edition is considered one of the best and the central exhibition, ‘The Milk of Dreams’, has been particularly widely praised. So here are my tips for the first time visitor:

Trending Articles

Join the FAD newsletter and get the latest news and articles straight to your inbox

* indicates required