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Alastair Mackie Answers FAD's Questions - FAD Magazine

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Alastair Mackie Answers FAD’s Questions

mimetes-anon-economist-plaza-installation-bronze-2009

photos by Tessa Angus courtesy of All Visual Arts.
1 When did you start to make art?
I started making a complex system of underground tunnels and bases in trees on my parent’s farm from when I was six or seven – does that count?

2 How did you evolve into a professional artist?
I’m not sure exactly what a professional artist is! It took me quite a long time to realise that I was even an artist (some time after having left art school!). I guess that I started to take things more seriously when I realised that I didn’t necessarily need to have all the answers now and that I was probably in it for life.

3 What drove you to make art as a professional vocation?
I wasn’t sure what else to do. One thing led to another.

4 Explain your inspiration?
People, nature, the planet – space, science, art – opposites, equilibriums, contradictions – etc, etc.

5 In what way does your inspiration transform into ideas?
I write things down as a way of capturing them, sometimes just words, and generally have a mix of impressions, pictures, and sentiments in my head. Some times things link up (this can take years and normally happens on trains, in the bath, or in the middle of the night), others go nowhere.

6 From Ideas to production of art – how? And why?

Once things have linked up they can be explored and a mental image is created. The challenge is to realise this image to a point from which a response can be made, so it’s a kind of ongoing conversation.

7 Could your ideas be portrayed in any other medium? If so which?
Yes – any.

8 Which artists would you most like to blatantly rip off?
Olafur Eliasson – The Mediated Notion.

9 Why is your art made?
In order to attain a sense of purpose.

10 What does being an artists mean to you?
It gives me a sense of purpose.

11 Are you happy with your reasons for making art? i.e Are there any trade offs that make life hard?
Sometimes the commercial side of things can be confusing and hard work. The art world (system) is quite small, so you kind of need to play ball. There’s no real security in it and you go to bed with it – so that can be stressful.

12 When does your art become successful?

When I’m happy with it / when other people respond to it.

13 What is art?
Pass.

14 How do you start the process of making work?
Refer to questions 1, 4-6.

15 Who prices your work? And how is the price decided upon?
Myself and the people I work with. The price is relative to previous works.

16 What is your next; move,project,show etc?
There are a few things in the pipeline for next year including group shows in NY, Mumbai, and South Korea and a solo show pencilled in with All Visual Arts for the end of the year.

17 What are the pros and cons of the art market?
The pros are that there is one and the cons are that as an artist, to a certain extent, you depend on it.
untitled-mouse-skeletons-mouse-fur-loom-concrete-2009

18 Which pieces would you like to be remembered for?

Hopefully future works. Untitled (+/-) so far.

19 Any routine in making your artwork? If so what?

None.

20 What has been the biggest break in your career?
Realising I didn’t necessarily need to know exactly what it was I was doing.

21 Who has been the biggest influence on you?
Edward Gorey – The Gashlycrumb Tinies.

22 How many artworks have you given away and to whom?
Not very many – once I asked for a piece back and sold it in order to pay my rent (mental note to re-make that piece and give it back!).

More info: www.alastairmackie.com / www.allvisualarts.org

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