Japanese art collective TeamLab create a sea of spiralling whirlpools for the NGV Triennial

Japanese art collective TeamLab have used lighting to create a sea of spiralling whirlpools inside the National Gallery of Victoria as part of the NGV Triennial.

teamlab-art-installation-moving-creates-vortices-vortices-create-movement-melbourne-australia- FAD Magazine

Designed to look like whirlpools in water, the installation is created from “immersive and responsive” lights that project moving lines on the floor. These lights are programmed to respond to the presence and movement of people in the room.

“When a person moves, a force is applied in that direction. As a result, a flow occurs, the faster the person moves, the stronger the force is applied in that direction. If a person is not moving or there are no more people, no flow will occur and nothing will be present in the space.”

TeamLab

The project is titled Moving Creates Vorticles Create Movement.

“Works are born and continue to transform under the influence of people’s movement,”

“In the ocean, complicated terrain such as an island produces flow velocity difference and a vortex is generated. Vortices swirl up the carcasses of organisms sunk to the bottom of the ocean, producing nutritious seawater. This becomes a source of nutrition for plankton to grow and nourishes the sea life. Vortices therefore contribute to enriching the ocean.”

teamlab-art-installation-moving-creates-vortices-vortices-create-movement-melbourne-australia- FAD Magazine

teamlab-art-installation-moving-creates-vortices-vortices-create-movement-melbourne-australia- FAD Magazine

NGV INTERNATIONAL 15 DEC 17 – 15 APR 18 www.ngv.vic.gov.au/triennial

About Mark Westall

Mark Westall is the founder and editor of FAD magazine, a curation of the world’s most interesting culture, and Creative Director of FAD Agency, a digital creative agency: www.fad.agency