PREVIEW: The Catlin Guide New Artists : Rosamund Lakin

Rosamund Lakin ‘All of the people

Today at London Art Fair, The Catlin Guide New Artists 2015 is Launched and so FAD is showcasing some of the Artists Featured here we have:
Rosamund Lakin

What made you want to be an artist?
Making art is something I fall in and out of love with, but the reason why I make art is because it’s good for me. As an artist, you seek and dissect material in a way you never would in everyday life. Finishing a piece of work, feeling that you have fulfilled your intentions is the most rewarding thing, and then being able to see people respond to you work is very stimulating.

How has your practice changed over the course?
When I first went to Art School, I was painting on large canvases. I have always had a great love of cinema, but it was only until I went to the Ruskin, that I felt able to start making moving image works. To have the confidence to not try and impress with my skills and technique and to embrace the fact that moving image work demands a lot of ideas.

How does it feel to be in the Catlin Guide?
Thrilling, being selected as an ‘emerging artist’ is very encouraging and it is reassuring to have that affirmation. I am very much looking forward to seeing the final publication and the exhibition and seeing who I am ‘rubbing shoulders’ with.

What is your studio routine?
I write a lot of my ideas, references, thoughts and experiences in my notebooks. I also have many hard drives with videos, images, articles that I have come across and archived away. I predominantly work in moving image, and enjoy the process of developing an idea over a period of time. It takes a lot of research, re-shoots and editing to produce my videos, making the ideas into something communicable.

Where do you see yourself in five years time?
I am motivated to keep producing moving image installations. I would also like to gain more technical skills so I can carry out some of the more challenging ideas I have for my video work. The recent exhibitions/residencies I’ve done, have made me think more about my work as it is accessed in an online format. I would like to start using the internet to document my creative processes and become a valid artistic practice, an extension of my work.

What artists inspire you?
Mark Leckey, Seth Price, Elizabeth Price, Camille Henrot, Chris Marker, Christian Marclay. As well as many filmmakers, such as Stanley Kubrick, Roy Andersson, Wong Kar Wai, Joanna Hogg.

How does it feel to be leaving University?
I’ve left, and although daunting, it has not been as displacing as I thought it would be. When you’re at art school, you don’t feel inhibited – you can make work in a supportive, positive environment. You are part of a community, which is stimulating and encouraging, but also critical. It offers a ready made, well-informed audience that give you instant feedback and question and challenge you, which helps to hone and clarify your ambitions. The challenge now is to find a way of working and engaging with new audiences to counteract that isolation.

Rosamund Lakin ‘All of the people
What are the best shows you’ve seen in the past year?
Ryan Trecartin/Lizzie Fitch at the Zabludowicz Collection.
Ed Atkins at the Sackler Gallery.
Camille Henrot The Pale Fox at the Chisenhale.

What makes a great artist?
Someone who has a focused argument or proposition or a real insight. And someone who doesn’t stop, and shares their creative processes rather than just presenting the finished work on completion.

How do you negotiate the pressure to be a commercially viable artist?
If by that you mean an artist that can sell work, then … I would say that my work is not centered around the primacy of the exhibited art object. Online content is circulated in economies of plentitude rather than scarcity, and so it is still quite unfixed how an artist can sell work that is based online, or in a digital file form.

If you were given a big commission what work would you want to realise?
I would want to make a new work that allows me to utilise other people’s professional expertise. Currently I make all my work on my own, having to teach myself new software and computer programmes etc, but there is only so much I can achieve on my own. I would also want to have a go at producing a short film in a professional manner, to see if all the film industry’s stages of production could really benefit my way of working.

Who do you think should have won the Turner Prize?
I think Duncan Campbell was a worthy winner. It is great to see moving image work coming to the forefront more and more. Otherwise I would have liked to have seen James Richards win.

What are the best galleries in the UK?
Chisenhale gallery in London and Spike Island in Bristol always seem to be very ‘on it’ with the artists they exhibit.

Finally if you had $50,000 to spend on art which artists would you buy into?
That’s a tough one. The phrase ‘buy into’ suggests an element of investment and return. I think the investment I would like to make is in artists as workers, to enable someone to do something that they couldn’t otherwise.

Read the fist Q&A with ALICE MAY WILLIAMS

Read the second Q&A with DOMINIC HAWGOOD

Read the third Q&A with HELEN WILSON

About Mark Westall

Mark Westall is the founder and editor of FAD magazine, a curation of the world’s most interesting culture, and Creative Director of FAD Agency, a strategy & creative agency working with brands to solve business problems using cultural tools. In 2008 following his passion for art he founded what has grown to become FAD magazine. FAD magazine is internationally recognized as a key figure within the emerging and contemporary art world, and has been selected as official partner by organizations as diverse as Moniker Art Fair, START, Volta and Christie’s. In addition Mark is a columnist for City Magazine.